Training Courses

COURSE INDEX

 

 

Preventing Racial Profile Practices:  A Course for Officers

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Length: 2 Days (5 day TTT)
Audience: Officers, Front Line Administrators, Support Personnel, Executives
Instructional Approach: Expert-Led with discussion, video, hands-on activities, role play exercises
Prerequisites: None
Delivery: Train the Trainer, LC Classes, Instructor on-site

The purpose of the course is to help participants gain a better understanding of racial profiling and to learn effective strategies for preventing the practice. Police officers and instructional designers developed the course to help law enforcement professionals make good decisions when conducting stops, and to interact effectively with stop subjects during the contact. While this course is entitled “Preventing Racial Profiling Practices”, the decision-making and communication skills learned during the course can be applied to situations outside of the racial profiling context. The course is targeted towards the practice of racial profiling, however, and the overview, scenarios, activities and discussions are focused on this subject.

The course is divided into three parts. The first part of the course is designed to provide officers with a safe environment to discuss racial profiling and raise questions and concerns about profiling practices and perceptions. The intent of this portion of the course is to provide a baseline understanding of the issue, community perceptions, and the impacts of those perceptions.

The second part of the course is designed to provide officers with the fundamental skills required to make good decisions, and to interact effectively with community members. During this portion of the course officers will review ethical decision making practices, objective vs. subjective indicators of criminal activity, cultural considerations during stops, and communication skills.

The third part of the course provides officers the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge discussed in the first two sections. Participants will first apply ethical decision making skills, and use objective indicators to make good, non-biased stops. Participants will then apply cultural and communications skills to stop contacts, to help ensure that the police-community interaction is successful.

Agenda and Objectives

Module 1, Course Introduction, is designed to prepare the instructor and participants for a successful class. During this module, participants will review the course agenda, objectives, materials, expectations and the facilities. The overall goal of this module is to prepare the class for a successful conduct and to establish baseline expectations.

  • After completion of module 1, participants will be able to:
  • Describe the purpose of the course and what they should expect to learn over the next two days
  • Describe the course materials, and explain how the materials will be used during the course and as reference material after the course has been completed
  • Explain the layout of the course facilities, and describe when and where course breaks, lunch and start and end times will occur
  • Describe individual and class expectations for the course, and discuss class rules so that the class can be conducted respectfully and on time

Module 2, Racial Profiling Overview, is structured to provide an introduction to, and an overview of Racial Profiling. In addition to providing definitions, participants will discuss why this issue is so important to Law Enforcement, the Media, and Communities. This module is interactive – participants will spend a significant portion of the module in discussion. The overall goal of this module is to provide law enforcement professionals an open environment in which to discuss perceptions and concerns of the issue, while grounding beliefs in the community, media, court and government perspectives and risks engendered from the issue.

After completing module 2, participants will be able to:

  • Provide a factual definition of racial profiling that is based upon the most current scientific thinking when asked by a member of law enforcement or the community at large
  • Explain the racial profiling perspectives from four stakeholder groups (law enforcement, community, courts, government)
  • Recall at least 3 risk factors for law enforcement agencies that participate in racial profiling when on patrol or working in the field
  • Explain why racial profiling is an ineffective method for identifying and deterring criminal activity
  • Define discretion, police officer’s use of discretion and the results of the positive and negative use of discretion

Module 3, Assessing the Impact, is structured to provide an introduction to the basic principles behind community-based policing, and the impacts of the practice or perception of racial profiling. In this module, participants will review the effects of racial profiling on Law Enforcement and the Community. This module is interactive – participants will spend a significant portion of the module in discussion. The goal of this module is to help participants understand how the perception of the practice has impacted communities across the country.

After completion of this module, participants will be able to:

  • Describe Community Based Policing, how it works and its advantages to the community and law enforcement
  • Explain minority strategies used to cope with the perception of racial profiling
  • Identify at least 3 impacts that racial profiling may have on law enforcement and the community and be able to respond to inquiries from concerned individuals
  • Discuss law enforcement practices, and explain how these practices may perpetuate the practice of racial profiling
  • List at least five examples of actions that Law Enforcement can take to address the perception of racial profiling

Module 4, Making Ethical Decisions, is structured to provide a basic review of ethics. Participants will define and review ethics and professionalism, and will discuss some specific theories of ethics. At the end of this module, participants will practice applying making ethical decisions. The overall goal is to provide participants with a framework for making ethical, non-biased decisions, and to consider racial profiling in ethical contexts.

After completing this module, participants will be able to:

  • Define ethics, explain the law enforcement code of ethics, and paraphrase the code
  • Define values and principles as they relate to ethics
  • Discuss expectations that our society has for law enforcement by including perspectives from the community, the law enforcement department, and the government
  • Discuss the impact of unethical behavior on law enforcement and community relationships
  • Describe the virtue-based, duty-based, and consequence-based ethical models, and explain the primary differences between each model
  • List the steps associated with making ethical decisions, and apply those steps to make decisions when faced with ethical scenarios

Module 5, Cultural Considerations in Law Enforcement, provides a description of the components of culture, and why culture is so important to Law Enforcement.

Participants will discuss how cultural differences impact the quality and perception of law enforcement contact with different groups in the community. At the end of this module, participants will practice applying “cultural competency” skills to real-life scenarios. The overall goal of this module is to help participants understand how culture may affect officer’s decision-making process, and how culture may impact how citizens perceive officer conduct during stops.

After completing this module, participants will be able to:

  • List and discuss the components of culture
  • Explain what cultural filters are and list the five key filters necessary to overcome in order to establish positive contacts with the community
  • Discuss expectations that our society has for law enforcement by including perspectives from the community, the law enforcement department, and the government
  • Describe some of the ways in which culture impacts law enforcement/community relations
  • List the culturally competent strategies available to law enforcement officers for improving safety and credibility for use in daily contact with the community

Module 6, Objective Assessment of Criminal Activity, is structured to provide an overview of the use of individual characteristics, observable behaviors and criminal indicators in identifying criminal activity. Participants will learn how these components may be used objectively or subjectively, and how the use of these components can lead to good stops or biased stops. At the end of this module, participants will practice identifying and distinguishing the objective use of these components. The goal of this module is to enable participants to identify the specific factors required to make an objective, non-biased stop.

After completion of module 6, participants will be able to:

  • Define individual characteristics, behaviors, and key indicators and explain how these components influence assessment of criminal activity
  • Provide 4 examples of the objective and subjective use of these components
  • Explain how culture and ethics impact the use of these assessment components
  • Interpret a set of scenarios and identify the objective and subjective use of assessment components

Module 7, Effective Communications, is structured to provide the fundamentals of communicating effectively. Participants will discuss why communicating effectively to communities, especially during stops, is so critical to law enforcement. Participants will discuss and practice effective listening techniques during this module. The overall goal is to equip officers with the basic communication skills to positively affect citizen perceptions during stops.

After completing this module, participants will be able to:

  • List and discuss the four basic skills associated with communicating effectively
  • Discuss the two major styles of communication and explain the differences between each
  • List and discuss the five keys to successful cross-cultural communication
  • Explain the steps associated with making effective citizen contacts

Module 8, Managing Citizen Contacts, is structured to provide participants practice time to use the knowledge and skills developed during this course. Participants will engage in a series of role plays and critiques designed to provide them practice with establishing specific rationale for making contacts, and practice in communicating the rationale to citizens contacted. The goal of this module is to enable participants to identify and articulate the decision making process in making stops.

After completion of module 8, participants will be able to:

  • Apply objective use of components to effectively interpret behaviors and key indicators
  • Effectively and professionally communicate reasons for actions taken, including ethical considerations, the objective use of criminal assessment components, and officer obligations as it relates to the law and community expectations for law enforcement.

Preventing Racial Profile Practices:  A Course for Front Line Supervisors

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Length: 2 Days (5 day TTT)
Audience: Supervisors, Police Administrators, Police Executives
Instructional Approach: Instructor-Led with discussion and hands-on activities
Prerequisites: None
Delivery: Train the Trainer, LC Classes, Instructor on-site

The purpose of this training is to provide line level supervisors with a comprehensive understanding of racial profiling and the general impact the issue has on law enforcement, the community and other important stakeholders.  Additionally, the course will provide specific strategies for those individuals responsible for monitoring, evaluating, managing and directing the behavior of street level law enforcement personnel in a manner that prevents the practice and or perception of racial profiling during the delivery of service to the community.

Agenda and Objectives

Module 1, Course Introduction, is designed to prepare the instructor and participants for a successful class. During this module, participants will review the course agenda, objectives, materials, expectations and the facilities. The overall goal of this module is to prepare the class for a successful conduct and to establish baseline expectations. After completion of module 1, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the purpose of the course and what they should expect to learn over the next two days
  • Describe the course materials, and explain how the materials will be used during the course and as reference material after the course has been completed
  • Explain the layout of the course facilities, and describe when and where course breaks, lunch and start and end times will occur
  • Describe individual and class expectations for the course, and discuss class rules so that the class can be conducted respectfully and on time

Module 2, Racial Profiling Overview, is structured to provide an introduction to, and an overview of Racial Profiling. In addition to providing definitions, participants will discuss why this issue is so important to Law Enforcement, the Media, and Communities. This module is interactive – participants will spend a significant portion of the module in discussion. The overall goal of this module is to provide law enforcement professionals an open environment in which to discuss perceptions and concerns of the issue, while grounding beliefs in the community, media, court and government perspectives and risks engendered from the issue.

After completing module 2, participants will be able to:

  • Provide a factual definition of racial profiling that is based upon the most current scientific thinking when asked by a member of law enforcement or the community at large
  • Explain the racial profiling perspectives from four stakeholder groups (law enforcement, community, courts, government)
  • Recall at least 3 risk factors for law enforcement agencies that participate in racial profiling when on patrol or working in the field
  • Explain why racial profiling is an ineffective method for identifying and deterring criminal activity
  • Define discretion, police officer’s use of discretion and the results of the positive and negative use of discretion

Module 3, Assessing the Impact, is structured to provide an introduction to the basic principles behind community-based policing, and the impacts of the practice or perception of racial profiling. In this module, participants will review the effects of racial profiling on Law Enforcement and the Community. This module is interactive – participants will spend a significant portion of the module in discussion. The goal of this module is to help participants understand how the perception of the practice has impacted communities across the country.

After completion of this module, participants will be able to:

  • Describe Community Based Policing, how it works and its advantages to the community and law enforcement
  • Explain minority strategies used to cope with the perception of racial profiling
  • Identify at least 3 impacts that racial profiling may have on law enforcement and the community and be able to respond to inquiries from concerned individuals
  • Discuss law enforcement practices, and explain how these practices may perpetuate the practice of racial profiling
  • List at least five examples of actions that Law Enforcement can take to address the perception of racial profiling

Module 4, Objective Assessment of Criminal Activity, is structured to provide an overview of the use of individual characteristics, observable behaviors and criminal indicators in identifying criminal activity. Participants will learn how these components may be used objectively or subjectively, and how the use of these components can lead to good stops or biased stops. At the end of this module, participants will practice identifying and distinguishing the objective use of these components. The goal of this module is to enable participants to identify the specific factors required to make an objective, non-biased stop. After completion of module 4, participants will be able to:

  • Define individual characteristics, behaviors, and key indicators and explain how these components influence assessment of criminal activity
  • Provide 4 examples of the objective and subjective use of these components
  • Explain how culture and ethics impact the use of these assessment components
  • Interpret a set of scenarios and identify the objective and subjective use of assessment components

Module 5, Managing Staff Behavior, is structured to provide an overview of supervisor liability, and help enable supervisor’s to take a more proactive approach towards addressing officer behavior. Supervisors learn about corrective actions within their scope of control, and review corrective actions that they can take to address behavioral issues. Supervisors also learn when an issue lies outside of their scope of control, and how best to address issue of this nature.

After completion of module 5, participants will be able to:

  • Define vicarious liability and explain why it is important to front line supervisors
  • Identify and describe 5 types of liability important to management within a law enforcement agency
  • Describe the problem analysis, needs assessment steps used to address behavioral issues
  • Define scope of control and scope of concern and how each concept relates to supervisory responsibility
  • Define at least 6 corrective actions a supervisor can take that are within his or her scope of control
  • Identify and explain the 2 corrective actions that lie outside of a supervisor’s scope of control, but within a supervisor’s scope of concern
  • Analyze officer performance issues and correctly apply the appropriate corrective actions using the problem analysis and needs assessment model

Module 6, Leadership, is structured to provide participant’s with an overview of leadership styles, characteristics and skills. The content is framed to assist front line supervisors in understanding the leadership roles they play in the department, and to provide them an appreciation of how their actions affect officer morale and perception.

After completion of module 6, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the difference between the traditional and new view of management
  • Define the new mid level manager responsibilities
  • Define leadership and explain why leaders are important
  • Identify and define the 5 leadership styles
  • Identify and describe the four leadership qualities
  • Identify and describe the four leadership skills

Module 7, Managing Organizational Change, is structured to provide participant’s with an understanding of the change process, how change affects organizations, and the roles that Supervisors can play during organizational change. The context provided is for programs targeted at addressing racial profiling issues such as data collection efforts, in which new roles and responsibilities are introduced.

After completion of module 7, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the change acceptance curve and explain why change is a process and not an event
  • Discuss the 3 critical components fundamental developing or changing individual behavior and performance
  • Describe at least 4 pillar initiatives targeted at supporting organizational performance
  • Describe why individuals resist organizational change
  • Describe the three levels of resistance to change, and the best approaches to addressing each level of resistance
  • Define the 4 basic roles individuals play within the change process
  • Define a change agent and discuss their role as change agent’s in the change process

Module 8, Managing Racial Profiling Programs – Data Collection, is structured to provide participant’s with an overview of racial profiling programs such as data collection. In this module, the data collection program is reviewed, and all elements and roles and responsibilities for collecting data are discussed. The context provided is data collection relative to a study used to analyze the data relative to the racial profiling issue.

After completion of module 8, participants will be able to:

  • Provide a factual definition of the following terms when asked: Stop Data, Stop Data Collection Programs, Benchmark Data, and Benchmark Surveys.
  • List at least (4) critical elements of a comprehensive data collection program.
  • Describe the officer’s, and supervisor’s critical roles within the Stop Data Collection program.
  • Describe how the data collection instrument is used to capture stop data.
  • Describe how data is transferred to the department’s internal computer systems.
  • Perform a review of stop data to ensure that all data is captured and transferred properly.

 

Enhancing Police & Community Trust: A Law Enforcement & Community Workshop

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Length: 1 day
Audience: Community Members and Law Enforcement Personnel (Administration, Front Line Supervisors & Front Line Police Officers)
Instructional Approach: Instructor-led, participant centered
Prerequisites: None
Delivery: On-Site Instructor, Joint Law Enforcement / Community Training.

This one day session was developed by Lamberth Consulting, and implemented by the ACLU, NAACP and NCCJ in several counties in Michigan to assist law enforcement in engaging with community stakeholders concerned about the issue. The morning session is comprised of separate law enforcement and community training sessions that are both structured to provide basic information on the topic, and help to develop understanding of different stakeholder perceptions.

In the afternoon, both groups are brought together in a facilitated workshop session designed to get all participants involved in developing strategies to address the issue in the agency and in the community. The deliverable of this workshop is a joint LE/Community Task Force chartered to address the issue on an on-going basis.

Agenda and Objectives

Module 1A, Instructor Led Community Session, Develop fundamental understanding of racial profiling and the issues related to racial profiling including the impact on all identified stakeholders.

Module 1B, Instructor Led Law Enforcement Session, Develop fundamental understanding of racial profiling and the issues related to racial profiling including the impact on all identified stakeholders.

Module 2, Instructor Led Combined Session, Engage in discussion to focus on solutions establish a commitment to develop a task force comprised of participants from both groups with a primary focus on community solutions.
 

Addressing the Racial Profiling Issues - An Overview for Executives

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Length: 4 hours (no TTT option is provided for this course)
Audience: Police Executives, Managers, Front Line Administrators
Instructional Approach: Expert-Led with discussion and facilitated work sessions
Prerequisites: None
Delivery: LC Classes, On-Site Instructor

The purpose of the "Addressing the Racial Profiling Issue – An Overview for Police Executives" course is to provide participants with a foundation upon which to analyze and respond to internal and external stakeholder concerns of racial profiling in their departments. The course is targeted towards police executives, and is structured to provide an overview and discussion of the impacts racial profiling has on law enforcement and the communities they serve.

The course is divided into two parts, and can be delivered in 4 hours. The first part of the course is designed to provide police executives with an over view of racial profiling, and its impacts and effects on law enforcement, the community, governments and our courts system. The intent of this portion of the course is to provide a baseline understanding of the issue, community, government and court perceptions, and the impacts of those perceptions.

The second part of the course consists of a structured discussion in which executives discuss the issue in terms of their departments, and identify and brainstorm key stakeholders to the issue, assessment and response activities, community concerns and responses and dealing with the media. During this portion of the class, participants will hear about national responses to the issue in litigation and what how departments across the country have addressed the issue.

Agenda and Objectives

Module 1, Racial Profiling Introduction, is structured to provide an introduction to Racial Profiling. Participants will discuss national impacts of the issue on law enforcement, the media, and communities. The overall goal of this module is to provide law enforcement executives a perspectives on how the issue has affected law enforcement agencies across the country, and how communities, the media, and courts have dealt with the issue.

After completing module 1, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the effect of the issue on law enforcement and governments across the country
  • Describe community responses to the perception of the practice across the country
  • Explain the courts response to the issue across the country

Module 2, Developing Solutions, is structured to provide participants an opportunity to discuss, and collectively develop strategies for addressing the issue in their respective departments. A working session will be facilitated in which participants will discuss how the issue has affected their department and their community. Internal perceptions and concerns, and key stakeholder groups will be discussed and reviewed, as will litigation effects and responses from across the country.

After completing module 2, participants will be able to:

  • List at least five different approaches that a department can take to address the issue internally.
  • Describe litigation activities to date, and discuss how litigation has affected communities, law enforcement and the RP issue
  • List expected concerns and perspectives in their own departments in association with the issue.
  • List barriers to change in their own departments.
  • Describe specific strategies and activities to address department concerns, and overcome barriers to change.

 

Collecting Stop Data

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Length: 4 hours
Audience: Police Officers, Stop Data Collection Managers, Police Executives
Instructional Approach: Instructor-Led with discussion and hands-on activities
Prerequisites: None

The purpose of the "Collecting Stop Data" course is to provide participants with an introduction to racial profiling, and to enable them to participate constructively in a stop data collection program. The course is targeted towards officers who will participate in a stop data collection program, and is structured to influence participant’s beliefs as well as develop skills.

The course is structured to provide a baseline understanding of why collecting stop data is necessary. The course provides an introduction to the impacts of racial profiling on the community and law enforcement, and includes dialogue on how collecting stop data is a critical part of responding to the issue. Participants will also learn the components of stop data programs, and get hands-on experience in completing and reviewing stop data forms.

Module 1, Racial Profiling Introduction, is structured to provide an introduction to Racial Profiling.  Participants will discuss national impacts of the issue on Law Enforcement, the Media, and Communities.  The overall goal of this module is to provide law enforcement executives a perspectives on how the issue has affected law enforcement agencies across the country, and how communities, the media, and courts have dealt with the issue.

Module 2, Assessing the Impact, is structured to provide an introduction to the basic principles behind community-based policing, and the impacts of the practice or perception of racial profiling.  In this module, participants will review the effects of racial profiling on Law Enforcement and the Community. This module is interactive – participants will spend a significant portion of the module in discussion.  The goal of this module is to help participants understand how the perception of the practice has impacted communities across the country.

Module 3, Managing Racial Profiling Programs – Data Collection, is structured to provide participant’s with an overview of racial profiling programs such as data collection.  In this module, the data collection program is reviewed, and all elements and roles and responsibilities for collecting data are discussed.  The context provided is data collection relative to a study used to analyze the data relative to the racial profiling issue.

 

Benchmark Surveying

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Length: 1 Day
Audience: Surveyors, Survey Team Leads
Instructional Approach: Instructor-Led with discussion, hands-on practice
Prerequisites: None

The purpose of the "Benchmark Surveying" course is to provide participants with the fundamental knowledge and skills required to conduct traffic surveys. The course provides a high-level overview of the study, and focuses on the methods and skills required to survey. The course has been developed in a modular format, and is appropriate for survey team leads and surveyors.

Participants will learn the basic kinds of traffic surveys, survey timing, surveyor positioning, data element capture, start and stop techniques, and data reduction methods. Survey team leads will learn the basics for managing a survey team, including scheduling, interacting with police liaisons, data integrity, surveyor supervision, and survey maintenance and reporting. The most critical element of the course includes hands-on surveying, in which surveyors will practice and get rated on surveying skills.

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